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The Image of a Broadcast Test Card, with the writing “t-/ TSD”. Illustrated by Gareth Williamson

Since Cyberpunk 2077 launched on December 6th, Game Informer’s Liana Ruppert wrote the article Cyberpunk 2077 Epileptic PSA. It warned that users who had photosensitive epilepsy (PSE) could have seizures during the braindance scenes (Cyberpunk’s version of VR), which she did on one occasion, as the strobe light effect contained in those scenes sequence can trigger seizures. CD PROJEKT RED’s (CDPR) reacted well, releasing a patch on December 12th. The patch included a trigger warning and a change to the animations that could cause seizures for those with PSE. Liana explained what to look out for and how best to adapt your experience through settings and interaction changes, before the patch. …


A table is surrounded by a bubble, with a blue shadow silhouette of a missing waiter. Illustrated by Gareth Williamson
A table is surrounded by a bubble, with a blue shadow silhouette of a missing waiter. Illustrated by Gareth Williamson
A table is surrounded by a bubble, with a blue shadow showing a silhouette of a missing waiter. Illustrated by Gareth Williamson

Before lockdown I had worked in hospitality for 7 years, having previously worked in retail. When restaurants re-open, what are the best UX practices for improving efficiency through software input. The hospitality industry in the UK has called for social distancing restrictions to be dropped, as it would make it impossible for most restaurants to operate when they re-open. I agree with how impossible it is, but maybe we should try to improve service standards and efficiency to decrease contact points due Covid-19.

The points of contact for any hospitality worker are immense, between serving customers, clearing plates and inputting orders. Point of Service tills take up the time of the server that could be better used, and in a post-Covid industry, create a big risk for cleanliness when multiple users interact with these devices hundreds of times a day. …


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This is a street-scape of Rivington Street in London, with a mobile user holding his phone as a view-finder. On the phone screen part of the street is being edited, while the device asks the user, “How would you like to interact with this device?” There are two input types on the screen, a hover button on the bottom right and a menu drawer on the top right. Illustration by Gareth Williamson

Looking at bad usability in the design of a space, I’ve thought about when I worked in a restaurant with a service lift that was a foot off the ground and two foot deep. This gave all sorts problems to the staff, least of all constant back pain, as well as slower service. Both its placement and the device itself, hadn’t been designed with the user in mind.

In mobile both the hardware and software are designed around the user and to some degree, so is the packaging. How could the design of the packaging, inform the software use?

Phone design being rather uniform over the past few years, pushing for the usability of the most surface area, there isn’t much more that can be done with the technology that is available, except the lean toward foldable devices to push the market forward. But packaging, that can still be adapted to allow for more accessibility in its design. Look at Microsoft’s Adaptive Controller. The team that built it spent as much time on the hardware design as the packaging, making it as adaptive to use the hardware as to open the box the hardware sits in. We need packaging design that takes note of what may appear like fringe use cases. …

About

Gareth Williamson

UX Designer

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